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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 2, NUMBER 11, NOVEMBER 1989

NEWS...
RESEARCH NEWS


Item #d89nov6

"Clouds Complicate the Climate Issue," New Sci., p. 30, Oct. 14, 1989. Observations of precipitating ocean clouds suggest atmospheric pollution may extend their lifetimes by reducing rainfall rate. (See Albrecht article, PROF. PUBS./OF GEN. INTEREST, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--Nov. 1989.)


Item #d89nov7

"Wetter Clouds Could Dampen Global Greenhouse Warming," T. Slingo, Nature, p. 104, Sep. 14, 1989. British climate modelers demonstrate how sensitive their results are to the relative amounts of ice-crystal and water-drop clouds; this effect could halve estimates of global warming expected from increased CO2. (See Mitchell article, PROF. PUBS./OF GEN. INTEREST, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--Nov. 1989.)


Item #d89nov8

"How Living Things Keep the Planet Cool," New Sci., p. 31, Sep. 2, 1989. Calculations show that the evolution of life has had a key role in ameliorating greenhouse warming through Earth's history, by removing carbon dioxide. (See Schwartzman article, PROF. PUBS./OF GEN. INTEREST, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--Nov. 1989.)


Item #d89nov9

"Chemists Seek Mystery Mechanism of Ozone Destruction," New Sci., p. 32, Sep. 23, 1989. Calculations using new reaction rates indicate that currently known mechanisms can account for only about half the depletion of ozone observed during early spring in Antarctica. See Sander article, PROF. PUBS./STRATOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--Nov. 1989.)


Item #d89nov10

"Climate Follows the 'Double Sunspot Cycle'," New Sci., p. 27, Aug. 19, 1989. A 22-year periodicity detected in marine temperatures matches the sunspot cycle and has implications for detecting temperature trends. (See Newell article in Geophys. Res. Lett., p. 311, Apr. 1989.)


Item #d89nov11

"Ultraviolet Levels Down Not Up," S. Penkett, Nature, p. 283, Sep. 28, 1989. Increases in tropospheric ozone due to photochemical production, mostly in the industrialized Northern Hemisphere, can overcompensate for increased UV-B radiation resulting from stratospheric ozone depletion. (See Brühl article, Global Climate Change Digest, PROF. PUBS./ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION, Oct. 1989.)


Item #d89nov12

"Ozone's Effects on UV Documented," Eos, p. 791, Aug. 1989. Antarctic measurements in 1988 verify that the ozone hole led to increased ultraviolet radiation there. (See Lubin article, Global Climate Change Digest, PROF. PUBS./ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION, Oct. 1989.)

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