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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 2, NUMBER 9, SEPTEMBER 1989

NEWS...
U.S. SENATE PANEL APPROVES CFC FEES


Item #d89sep7

On July 21, 1989, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee approved a bill that would raise an estimated $400 million a year in fees on ozone-depleting substances. The bill also establishes regulations for eliminating their use by year 2000, accelerating the schedule presently required by the Montreal Protocol. A base fee of 60 cents per pound would be levied, which would rise to offset "windfall" profits expected by many as the restricted chemicals become more scarce. Other provisions pertain to venting of substances from household and commercial appliances and automobile air conditioners, and to certain fire extinguishers. (See Cong. Quart. Weekly Rep., p. 1856, July 22, 1989, and the following related articles.)

"Producers, Users Grapple with Realities of CFC Phaseout," P.S. Zurer, Chem. Eng. News, pp. 7-13, July 24, 1989. A detailed discussion of the requirements, chemicals and industries involved and the positions of the U.S. EPA and environmental groups in the United States.

"Manufacturers Push Use of HFAs as Effective Alternative for CFCs," Intl. Environ. Rptr., pp. 360-361, July 1989. The European Federation of Chemical Manufacturers considers hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs), currently undergoing toxicological and safety tests in Europe, to be the most important substitutes. The article also discusses alternatives recommended by a Friends of the Earth report released in June.

"CFC Producers [Allied-Signal and Du Pont] Race to Bring on Substitutes," M. Reisch, ibid., p. 8, July 3, 1989.

"International Gathering Plans Ways to Safeguard Atmospheric Ozone," D. O'Sullivan, Chem. Eng. News, pp. 33-36, June 26. Concerns the Helsinki meeting on the Montreal Protocol last May (see Global Climate Change Digest, NEWS, June 1989); includes a detailed explanation of the system for CFC and halon nomenclature.

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