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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 3, NUMBER 8, AUGUST 1990

NEWS...
RESEARCH NEWS


Item #d90aug62

"Warming Shouldn't Wither U.S. Farming," R. Monastersky, Science News, p. 308, May 19, 1990. The first comprehensive study on the topic finds that warming will not have major catastrophic effects on the welfare of producers or consumers of agricultural products. (See Adams article, PROF. PUBS./GEN. INTEREST, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--Aug. 1990).)


Item #d90aug63

"Methane May Amplify Climate Change," J. Gribbin, New Scientist, p. 31, June 2, 1990. Analysis of bubbles of air in the Antarctic Vostok ice core indicate that changes in methane levels in the past correlated with changes in climate. (See Chappellaz article, PROF. PUBS./GEN. INTEREST, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--Aug. 1990).)


Item #d90aug64

"That Thinning Feeling," Chem. & Industry, p. 275, May 7, 1990. Discusses the considerable uncertainties associated with measurements showing increasing UV-B radiation reported in Europe. (See Blumthaler article, PROF. PUBS./TREND ANALYSIS & PREDICTION, Global Climate Change Digest, June 1990.)


Item #d90aug65

"CO2 Jumps before Ice Sheets Slump," R. Monastersky, Science News, p. 382, June 16, 1990. Results from the Vostok ice core, presented by a University of Rhode Island group at the spring AGU meeting, provide new evidence that a rise in CO2 helped melt ice sheets at the end of an ice age about 130,000 years ago. (See also Science, p. 1607, June 29, 1990.)


Item #d90aug66

"Antarctic Ice Potentially Unstable," Science News, p. 285, May 5, 1990. Erratic motion observed recently in an Ant-arctic glacier indicates a serious lack of understanding of stability of the Antarctic ice sheet. A workshop report issued in April calls for more research to evaluate the likelihood that the ice sheet could collapse into the ocean in the next few centuries, which could cause a six-meter rise in sea level.

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