Global Climate Change Digest: Main Page | Introduction | Archives | Calendar | Copy Policy | Abbreviations | Guide to Publishers


GCRIO Home ->arrow Library ->arrow Archives of the Global Climate Change Digest ->arrow January 1993 ->arrow PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS... ENERGY POLICY, ANALYSIS AND USE: EUROPE Search

U.S. Global Change Research Information Office logo and link to home

Last Updated:
February 28, 2007

GCRIO Program Overview

 

 

Library 
Our extensive collection of documents.

 

Get Acrobat Reader

Privacy Policy

Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 6, NUMBER 1, JANUARY 1993

PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS...
ENERGY POLICY, ANALYSIS AND USE: EUROPE


Item #d93jan18

"A Carbon Tax To Reduce CO2 Emissions in Europe," P. Agostini (GRETA, Venice), M. Botteon, C. Carraro, Energy Econ., 14(4), 279-290, Oct. 1992.

Uses a sectoral model of energy saving and interfuel substitution to examine the effects of a carbon tax in OECD countries. Results provide mild support to the environmental role of a tax, but further analysis aimed at a specific country (Italy) does not favor a uniform tax. Country-specific policies are recommended; international cooperation ought to concern targets rather than instruments.


Item #d93jan19

Two items from Energy J., 13(3), 1992:

"Analysis of Unilateral CO2 Control in the European Community and OECD," J. Pezzey (Dept. Econ., Univ. Bristol, 8 Woodland Rd., Bristol BS8 1TN, UK), 159-171. Results of a static, six-region, perfect competition, general equilibrium model suggest that unilateral action even by large economies, although economically neutral overall, seems to be environmentally ineffective. However, international leadership or induced technical progress might change these conclusions.

"Energy Policy in the European Community: Conflicts between the Objectives of the Unified Single Market, Supply Security and a Clean Environment," J. Surrey (Sci. Policy Res. Unit, Univ. Sussex, UK), 207-231. Previous proposals of the Commission of the European Community for a unified internal energy market did not arise out of global warming concerns, and pose difficulties. The more recent proposals for reducing CO2 emissions and the European Energy Charter appear to mark positive steps toward a long-term strategy for a clean environment, energy efficiency, and oil and gas security.


Item #d93jan20

"Nuclear Power in the Structure of European Power Supply," J. Holzer (Bayernwerks AG, Nymphenburger Str. 39, W-8000 Munich 2, Ger.), Atomwirtschaft-Atomtechnik, 37(8-9), 398-402, Aug.-Sep. 1992. In German.

Nuclear power will have to take a greater role in future European power supply, to protect the global climate, balance North-South consumption of resources, and address the economic and ecological concerns of Eastern Europe.


Item #d93jan21

"EC Carbon Tax Would Bring Uncertainty to Oil Market," H.E. Hisham Nazer (Minister of Petroleum & Mineral Resour., Saudi Arabia), OPEC Bull., 23(6), 6-8, June 1992. Remarks to a meeting of the EC-Gulf Joint Council in May 1992, emphasizing the dilemma of oil producers over investment in facilities caused by the EC proposal to increase the tax on oil.


Item #d93jan22

"Eastern Europe in Transition: Energy Use and the Environment," M. Hafiz-Khodja (OPEC Secretariat, Obere Danaustr. 93, 1020 Vienna, Austria), R. Ferroukhi, ibid., 23(3), 10-16, Mar. 1992.

Analysis of the situation in Bulgaria, the former Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland and Rumania concludes that without massive financial assistance from other countries, the aim of reducing CO2 emissions and other pollutants could be overridden by other priorities.

  • Guide to Publishers
  • Index of Abbreviations

  • Hosted by U.S. Global Change Research Information Office. Copyright by Center for Environmental Information, Inc. For more information contact U.S. Global Change Research Information Office, Suite 250, 1717 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20006. Tel: +1 202 223 6262. Fax: +1 202 223 3065. Email: Web: www.gcrio.org. Webmaster:
    U.S. Climate Change Technology Program Intranet Logo and link to Home