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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 8, NUMBER 7, JULY 1995

PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS...
OF GENERAL INTEREST: FORESTS AND AFFORESTATION


Item #d95jul20

"The Evolution of International Policies and Mechanisms to Advance Sustainable Forest Management and Mitigate Global Climate Change," J. Bologna (Intl. For. Policy, USDA For. Service, POB 96538, Washington DC 20090), J. Lyke, K. Theophile, World Resour. Rev., 7(2), 169-189, June 1995.

Reviews international attention to deforestation since 1985, through institutions like the Tropical Forestry Action Program, the International Tropical Timber Organization, the World Bank, and through innovative financial arrangements between developed and developing countries. The next few years will see a proactive set of multilateral programs to address deforestation, an increasing link between trade and the environment, and more uses of financial incentives to encourage sustainable forest development.


Item #d95jul21

Three related items from Clim. Change, 30(3), July 1995:

"Valuation of Global Afforestation Programs for Carbon Mitigation," S. Nilsson (IIASA, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria), 249-257. An editorial that reviews some aspects of the application of traditional cost-benefit analysis to long-term environmental problems. Because good analyses can yield results that differ by more than an order of magnitude, asks if the discipline is advanced enough to give meaningful results on long-term environmental problems.

"On 'Valuation of Global Afforestation. . .by Sten Nilsson," H.F. Hoen (Norwegian For. Res. Inst., European Forest Inst., POB 5044, N-1432 ÅS, Norway), B. Solberg, 259-266. Comments on the preceding editorial, reaching a more optimistic conclusion regarding the role of cost-benefit analysis in evaluating alternative forest-related projects, programs or strategies connected to climate change issues.

"The Carbon Sequestration Potential of a Global Afforestation Program," S. Nilsson (address above), W. Schopfhauser, 267-293. Analyzes the changes in the carbon cycle that could be achieved with a global, large-scale afforestation program that is economically, politically, and technically feasible. Only about 345 million hectares would actually be available for the sole purpose of sequestering carbon, and the maximum rate of carbon fixation would only be achieved 60 years after the establishment of the plantations. Over the period 1995 to 2095, the amount of carbon sequestered would be substantially lower than that required to offset current carbon emissions.


Item #d95jul22

"Timber Labelling Scheme to Encourage the Achievement of Tropical Forest Sustainability," D. Robinson (2 Victoria Ct., Rothwell, Northants NN14 2TS, UK), S.D. Probert, Appl. Energy, 48(1), 65-93, 1995.

To reduce tropical timber export and thus insure sustainability, proposes a multi-criteria assessment procedure that would take into account deforestation (including burning), the negative effect of population growth, and the haulage distance from the country of origin the U.K. (to take into account fossil fuel consumption from transport).

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