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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

FROM VOLUME 8, NUMBER 9, SEPTEMBER 1995

PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS...
OF GENERAL INTEREST: CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENCE


Item #d95sep13

"The Evidence Mounts Up," M.C. MacCracken (U.S. Global Change Res. Prog., 300 D St. SW, Washington DC 20024), Nature, 376(6524), 645-646, Aug., 24, 1995.

Summarizes a week-long symposium examining climate variability over the past 1,000 years, which brought together results from an array of observational techniques, analyses of natural records, and model results (IUGG General Assembly, Boulder, Colorado, July 1995). Our climate is unusually warm, and although greenhouse gases and aerosols are not yet convicted beyond all reasonable doubt, the case is becoming steadily stronger.


Item #d95sep14

Two related items in Nature, 376(6539), Aug. 3, 1995:

"Stabilists Strike Again," D. Van der Wateren (Inst. Earth Sci., Free Univ., De Boelelaan 1085, NL 1081 HV Amsterdam, Neth.), R. Hindmarsh, 389-391. The following paper will start the next round of a ten-year debate on the stability of the Antarctic ice sheet, which is not likely to be settled until there is better geochronological data.

"Preservation of Miocene Glacier Ice in East Antarctica," D.E. Sugden (Dept. Geog., Univ. Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XP, UK), D.R. Marchant et al., 412-414. Reports the discovery of buried glacier ice in East Antarctica which appears to have survived for at least 8.1 million years. Stable polar conditions must have persisted in this region for at least that time.

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