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Global Climate Change DigestArchives of the
Global Climate Change Digest

A Guide to Information on Greenhouse Gases and Ozone Depletion
Published July 1988 through June 1999

Item #d98jun97

Recent warming: A combination of several proxy records of temperature and instrumental records shows that temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere have climbed higher than at any other time in the past six centuries, adding weight to a link between recent warming and greenhouse gases. (See Mann and Hegerl papers in Prof. Pubs./Of Gen. Interest, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--June 1998; Science News, p. 303, May 9; The New York Times science section, Apr. 28.)


Item #d98jun98

Rapid changes in ocean circulation are revealed by a new analysis of deep-sea corals, which provides a more detailed time history than do sediment records. (See Adkins paper in Prof. Pubs./Of Gen. Interest this Global Climate Change Digest issue--June 1998; and articles in Science, p. 679, May 1 and Science News, p. 277, May 2.)


Item #d98jun99

A climate change index that attempts to measure changes that average people would notice in everyday life suggests that climate change may already be apparent to residents of parts of Asia and northwestern North America. (See Hansen paper in Prof. Pubs./Of Gen. Interest, this Global Climate Change Digest issue--June 1998; also Science News, p. 246, Apr. 18.)


Item #d98jun100

Glacial melt: University of Colorado scientists reported at the Spring 1998 meeting of the American Geophysical Union that their study of hundreds of glaciers around the world shows they are melting faster than previously suspected.


Item #d98jun101

New Earth Institute: Columbia University has embarked on a bold experiment to combine the earth sciences with biology and social science in a global change program considered more ambitious than similar attempts at other institutions. The eleven components include Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the Biosphere 2 facility in Arizona, and the Consortium for International Earth Science Information (CIESIN), which recently moved from Michigan. (See extensive article in Science, pp. 1182-1185, May 22, 1998.)

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