Online Catalog

GCRIO Home ->arrow Links ->arrow Climate Change Mitigation: Policy Search
U.S. Global Change Research Information Office logo and link to home
Updated 7 February, 2004

Links
Climate Change Mitigation: Policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Addressing the Challenge of Global Climate Change 
blank   2003
Paula J. Dobriansky, Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs: "Therefore it is our intention to implement policies that will foster these technology-based solutions -- that is the way we will address the challenge of global climate change. Significantly, we also believe that climate change should not be pursued in isolation, but should be handled as an integral part of a broad strategic paradigm of sustainable development, which features a balanced mix of environmentally sound, pro-economic growth policies. At the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg and at the COP-8 meeting last year in New Delhi, we found strong and growing support for this position among developing countries." (64KB PDF file)
 
 
Changes in biologically active ultraviolet radiation reaching the Earth's surface 
blank    
Stratospheric ozone levels are near their lowest point since measurements began, so current ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their maximum. Total stratospheric content of ozone-depleting substances is expected to reach a maximum before the year 2000. All other things being equal, the current ozone losses and related UV-B increases should be close to their maximum.
 
 
Clean Development Mechanism: A Primer 
blank    
A short article published by Resources for the Future (RFF) in Weathervane, an online forum for analysis and commentary on U.S. and global policy initiatives related to climate change.
 
 
Climate Change: Office of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State 
blank    
The site is produced and maintained by the U.S. Dept. of State, Office of International Information Programs and provides access to climate change information.
 
 
Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 - 29 Oct 03 
blank   2003
Congressional debate regarding the Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 to provide for a program of scientific research on abrupt climate change, to accelerate the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States by establishing a market-driven system of greenhouse gas tradeable allowances that could be used interchangeably with passenger vehicle fuel economy standard credits, to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States and reduce dependence upon foreign oil, and ensure benefits to consumers from the trading in such allowances. (208KB PDF file)
 
 
Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 - 30 Oct 03 
blank   2003
Congressional debate regarding the Climate Stewardship Act of 2003 to provide for a program of scientific research on abrupt climate change, to accelerate the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States by establishing a market-driven system of greenhouse gas tradeable allowances that could be used interchangeably with passenger vehicle fuel economy standard credits, to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States and reduce dependence upon foreign oil, and ensure benefits to consumers from the trading in such allowances. (216KB PDF file)
 
 
Environmental effects of ozone depletion: 1998 assessment (Executive Summary) 
blank   1998
Decreased quantities of total-column ozone are now observed over large parts of the globe, permitting increased penetration of solar UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) to the Earth's surface. The 1998 assessment deals with the possible consequences. The Atmospheric Science Panel predicts that the ozone layer will be in its most vulnerable state during the coming two decades. Some of the effects are expected to occur during most of the next century. Recent studies show that the effects of ozone depletion would have been dramatically worse without the protective measures taken under the Montreal Protocol.
 
 
EPA Global Change Research Program 
blank    
EPA's Global Change Research Program is an assessment-oriented program with primary emphasis on understanding the potential consequences of climate variability and change on human health, ecosystems, and socioeconomic systems in the United States. The website is designed to provide a portal through which scientists, resource managers, and the public can access information about the program and partners.
 
 
Health Risks of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion 
blank    
The health risks associated with ozone depletion will principally be those due to increased ultraviolet-B(UV-B) radiation in the environment, i. e., increased damage to the eyes, the immune system, and the skin. Some new risks may also be introduced with the increased use of alternatives to the ozone-depleting substances (ODSs).
 
 
International Energy Agency (IEA) - Environmental Issues 
blank    
The International Energy Agency (IEA) is an autonomous agency linked with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and development (OECD). It is the energy forum for 26 member countries. They have become an authoritative source for energy statistics worldwide. They conduct analyses of actions to mitigate climate change, and energy and sustainable development. The website contains reports, papers, conference and workshop information, detailed information (descriptions, links, annual reports) concerning IEA Implementing Agreements, and energy statistics from member countries.
 
 
IPCC Working Group III Third Assessment Report, Mitigation of Climate Change (Summary for Policymakers) 
blank   2001
This report assess the scientific, technical, environmental, economic, and social aspects of the mitigation of climate change. The full report is published by Cambridge University Press. (112Kb PDF file)
 
 
Our Changing Planet - The FY 2002 US Global Change Research Program 
blank   2001
An annual report by the Subcommittee on Global Change Research, Committee on Environment and Natural Resources of the National Science and Technology Council. Our Changing Planet describes the US Global Change Research Program for FY 2002. Federal Agency activities and funding levels are presented. A printed copy of this publication can be obtained without charge by submitting a request to GCRIO (see contact information at bottom of page); or by using our on-line document request form.
 
 
Our Changing Planet FY 1998 - CENR and SGCR Membership 
blank   1998
Membership lists, Committee on Environment and Natural Resources and Subcommittee on Global Change Research
 
 
Our Changing Planet Report 2002: U.S. Global Change Research Program Near Term Plans - Atmospheric Composition 
blank   2002
The USGCRP budget includes $310 million in FY 2002 for research and observations related to improving understanding of ongoing changes in atmospheric composition. The atmosphere links the other components of the Earth system-including the oceans, land, terrestrial and marine biosphere, and the frozen regions. Because of these linkages, the atmosphere is a conduit of change. For example, natural events and human activities can change atmospheric composition in ways that alter the Earth's radiative (energy) balance. Associated responses involving the climate system and the stratospheric ozone layer influence the well-being of human and natural systems. Because the atmosphere is the 'fast mixer' in the Earth system, changes in the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere spread over very large areas very quickly. As a result, observations of changes in the atmosphere are among the very earliest harbingers of changes in the global environment. The very long atmospheric residence times of some chemical species cause changes in their concentrations to be virtually irreversible for decades, centuries, and millennia - thereby affecting all countries and populations, not just the emitters. The improving capability for modeling the composition of the global atmosphere as a whole is enabling quantification of the linkages between continental air quality and climate change, which were once considered separately and independently. Future research will build upon recent scientific accomplishments. In one of the extraordinary success stories of global change research, scientific understanding has led to measures that have reversed the decades-long growth in atmospheric concentrations of the substances responsible for depleting the stratospheric ozone layer.
 
 
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (additional information on figures/contact information) 
blank   2002
Our Changing Planet: The FY 2002 Global Change Research Program is a report to Congress supplementing the President's FY 2002 budget, pursuant to the Global Change Research Act of 1990. The report describes the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP); summarizes scientific insights from global change research, discusses the six Research Program Elements and FY 2002 plans in each of these research areas; and includes an appendix that details the FY 2002 budget, including program components and program highlights for each of the departments and agencies that comprise the USGCRP. Achieving the goals of this program will require continued strong support for the scientific research needed to improve understanding of how human activities are affecting the global environment, and of how natural and human-induced global change is affecting society and ecosystems.
 
 
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (Appendix A) 
blank   2002
The first table in this Appendix presents the FY 2001-FY 2002 USGCRP budget by Research Program Element, showing each department or agency's budgetary contribution to each element. The budget pages for individual participating agencies that follow include a listing of programs designated for inclusion in the USGCRP, as well as a general description of each agency's 'Areas of Global Change Research.' For each agency, a 'FY 2002 Program Highlights' section outlines briefly some of the key USGCRPrelated activities proposed for the coming year. In addition, the agencies conduct a broad range of 'Related Research,' as indicated, funding for which is not included as part of the USGCRP budget because the research is conducted primarily for other purposes.
 
 
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (climate variability and change) 
blank   2002
The USGCRP budget includes $486 million in FY 2002 for research and observations related to understanding climate variability and change. The Earth's prevailing climate is a fundamental element in the well-being of societies and natural systems. Climate strongly affects the viability of agriculture, the distribution and productivity of forests and rangelands, the diversity of flora and fauna, the availability of water, the spread of insects and rodents that carry human disease organisms, the intensity and frequency of floods and severe weather events, and much more. The essential scientific questions about climate system behavior range across all timescales, from seasons and years to decades, centuries, and millennia.
 
 
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (ecosystems/human dimensions/international) 
blank   2002
The USGCRP budget includes $199 million in FY 2002 for research and observations related to understanding changes in managed and unmanaged ecosystems. The USGCRP budget includes $107 million in FY 2002 for the study of the human dimensions of global change. The USGCRP contributes to and benefits from international research efforts to improve understanding of global change on both the regional and global scales.
 
 
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (front cover) 
blank   2002
Our Changing Planet: The FY 2002 US Global Change Research Program is a report to Congress supplementing the President's FY 2002 budget, pursuant to the Global Change Research Act of 1990. The report describes the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP); summarizes scientific insights from global change research, discusses the six Research Program Elements and FY 2002 plans in each of these research areas; and includes an appendix that details the FY 2002 budget, including program components and program highlights for each of the departments and agencies that comprise the USGCRP. Achieving the goals of this program will require continued strong support for the scientific research needed to improve understanding of how human activities are affecting the global environment, and of how natural and human-induced global change is affecting society and ecosystems.
 
 
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (Section 1) 
blank   2002
Our Changing Planet: FY 2002 (Section 2) 
blank   2002
Our Changing Planet: The Fiscal Year 2003 U.S. Global Change Research Program and Climate Change Research Initiative 
blank   2003
A report by the Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research as a supplement to the President's FY 2003 budget. (1.7MB PDF file)
 
 
Our Changing Planet: The FY 2002 US Global Change Research Program 
blank   2002
Our Changing Planet: The FY 2002 Global Change Research Program is a report to Congress supplementing the President's FY 2002 budget, pursuant to the Global Change Research Act of 1990. The report describes the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP); summarizes scientific insights from global change research, discusses the six Research Program Elements and FY 2002 plans in each of these research areas; and includes an appendix that details the FY 2002 budget, including program components and program highlights for each of the departments and agencies that comprise the USGCRP. Achieving the goals of this program will require continued strong support for the scientific research needed to improve understanding of how human activities are affecting the global environment, and of how natural and human-induced global change is affecting society and ecosystems.
 
 
Pew Center on Global Climate Change 
blank    
The Pew Center on Global Climate Change is a non-profit, non-partisan and independent organization dedicated to providing credible information, straight answers and innovative solutions in the effort to address global climate change.
 
 
Summary of the Ninth Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change 
blank   2003
The ninth Conference of the Parties (COP-9) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the nineteenth sessions of the COP's Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) were held at the Fiera Milan Congress Center in Milan, Italy, from 1-12 December 2003. (388KB PDF file)
 
 
Technologies, Polices, and Measures for Mitigation Climate Change - IPCC Technical Paper I 
blank   1996
This Technical Paper provides an overview and analysis of technologies and measures to limit and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to enhance GHG sinks under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The paper focuses on technologies and measures for the countries listed in Annex I of the FCCC, while noting information as appropriate for use by non- Annex I countries. Technologies and measures are examined over three time periods -- with a focus on the short term (present to 2010) and the medium term (2010-2020), but also including a discussion of longer-term (e.g., 2050) possibilities and opportunities.
 
 
Transportation Energy and Policy Analysis 
blank    
The Transportation Energy Policy Analysis group, a part of the Berkeley Lab's Energy Analysis Department, analyzes how the combination of vehicle technology, land-use patterns, and driving behavior affect energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector.
 
 
U.S. Pursuing Clean Coal Projects with Other Countries 
blank   2003
U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham says the United States is moving ahead in an unprecedented international effort to make clean energy the cornerstone of economic growth, improved health and closer ties among nations. (47KB PDF file)
 
 
UV-B Effects on Aquatic Ecosystems 
blank    
Regarding the effects of UV- B radiation on aquatic ecosystems, recent scientific and public interest has focused on marine primary producers and on the aquatic web, which has resulted in a multitude of studies indicating mostly detrimental effects of UV- B radiation on aquatic organisms. The interest has expanded to include ecologically significant groups and major biomass producers using mesocosm studies, emphasizing species interactions. This paper assesses the effects of UV- B radiation on dissolved organic matter, decomposers, primary and secondary producers, and briefly summarizes recent studies in freshwater and marine systems.
 
 
Weathervane: Resources for the Future's Digital Forum on Global Climate Change Policy or A Digital Forum on Global Climate Policy 
blank    
Weathervane, an online forum presented by Resources for the Future (RFF), is designed to provide the news media, legislators, opinion leaders, and the interested public with analysis and commentary on U.S. and global policy initiative related to climate change. It focuses is on the international negotiations that are to decide on goals and actions under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. Weathervane complements RFF's Climate Economics and Policy Program, which conducts research into climate change policy. The site contains numerous papers and discussions addressing climate policy and the economics of various mitigation policies and technologies, such as carbon and emissions trading and clean development mechanism.
 
 

 

 


U.S. Global Change Research Information Office, Suite 250, 1717 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20006. Tel: +1 202 223 6262. Fax: +1 202 223 3065. Email: . Web: www.gcrio.org. Webmaster: .
U.S. Climate Change Technology Program Intranet Logo and link to Home