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APPENDIX F

Contact Information


U.S. Global Change Research Program Coordination Office
David Goodrich, Executive Director
400 Virginia Avenue, SW
Suite 750
Washington, DC 20024
202-488-8630 (voice)
202-488-8681 (fax)
goodrich@usgcrp.gov (e-mail)
http://www.usgcrp.gov/ (WWW)
http://www.gcdis.usgcrp.gov/ (WWW)

National Assessment Coordination Office
Michael MacCracken, Executive Director
400 Virginia Avenue, SW
Suite 750
Washington, DC 20024
202-488-8630 (voice)
202-488-8681 (fax)
mmaccrac@usgcrp.gov (e-mail)
http://www.usgcrp.gov/ (WWW)

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change U.S. Coordination Office
Neil Leary, Head
400 Virginia Avenue, SW
Suite 750
Washington, DC 20024
202-314-2225 (voice)
202-488-8678 (fax)
ipcc@usgcrp.gov (e-mail)
http://www.usgcrp.gov/ipcc (WWW)

For additional information on USGCRP activities, or to obtain a copy of this document, contact the Global Change Research Information Office (GCRIO) at Suite 250, 1717 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20006. Tel: +1 202 223 6262. Fax: +1 202 223 3065. Email: information@gcrio.org. Web: www.gcrio.org.


Abstract

Our Changing Planet: The FY 2000 Global Change Research Program is a report to Congress supplementing the Presidentís FY 2000 budget, pursuant to the Global Change Research Act of 1990. The report describes the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP); outlines a perspective for global change research in the decade ahead and the changing vision for the research agenda; presents an implementation plan for the USGCRP in FY 2000, with a discussion of each of the Program Elements; outlines a FY 2000 initiative in Carbon Cycle Science; summarizes key USGCRP accomplishments in 1998; and provides a detailed view of the FY 2000 USGCRP budget, including FY 2000 program components and program highlights by agency. Achieving the goals of this program will require continued strong support for the scientific research needed to improve understanding of how human activities are affecting the global environment, and of how natural and human-induced change is affecting society.

For Further Information

Environment Division
Office of Science and Technology Policy
Executive Office of the President
Washington, DC 20502
202-456-6202 (voice)
202-456-6025 (fax)
http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/OSTP/html/OSTP Home.html (WWW).
http://www.usgcrp.gov/ (WWW)


Back Cover

    Record large 1998 Antarctic Ozone Hole: The 1998 Antarctic "Ozone Hole" was of record size, with the largest size being in excess of 27 million square km, observed briefly in September. This is some 5% larger than the largest previously observed hole, which was seen in 1996. The large area of ozone depletion was due to a correspondingly large Antarctic polar vortex in 1998. There is sufficient chemically activated chlorine in the polar vortex during this time period that all the air in the lower stratosphere inside the vortex is highly depleted in ozone. The vortex in 1998 also remained large later into the spring than is typically seen, so the region of ozone depletion associated with the polar vortex during the later part of the spring (especially the second half of November) was much larger in 1998 than in recent years. The reasons why the Antarctic polar vortex in 1998 was particularly large and stable are not understood, however, and remain an active area of research in stratospheric meteorology.

    Recovery of the ozone layer could be delayed by global warming because accumulation of greenhouse gases in the troposphere is expected to cause a cooling of the stratosphere. Recent model calculations have suggested that such changes in atmospheric temperature distributions and, therefore, wind systems, could result in more stable polar vortices, colder temperatures in the lower stratosphere, and concomitantly increased ozone depletion, especially at high latitudes. It is speculated that increased concentrations of greenhouse gases might, therefore, be at least partly responsible for the very large Arctic ozone losses observed in recent winters (especially 1996-97). Furthermore, this mechanism could result in Arctic ozone losses increasing for a decade after stratospheric chlorine levels peak, with future Arctic ozone losses rivaling those observed at present in the Antarctic. The severity and duration of the Antarctic ozone hole could also increase. These findings suggest the possibility that recovery of the ozone layer (confirmation of which will be complicated by the potential for large interannual variability in stratospheric meteorology) could be significantly delayed, and underscore the need for well-focused observations and further modeling to elucidate this potentially significant coupling of climate change with the state of the ozone layer.

Source: The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Research Group, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center


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